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Thur 4 June 12:00-13:30 High-level panel on the 2020 Delft Agenda - recording now available

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You can now watch the recording of this panel discussion here

INVITED HIGH-LEVEL PANEL DISCUSSION: DRAFTING THE DELFT AGENDA

  • From 12.00 CEST on Thursday 4 June you can see the livestream of this high-level panel discussion here. Once you're there you can just click on the PLAY button to get things started.
  • To ask questions or make comments you can toggle back to this tab on your brower and leave your comment at the bottom of this post. To ask a question, just use Q - question; and to ask a specific panel member use Q - NAME - question.

  • You can still comment on the emerging Delft Agenda here.

 

Moderators: Eddy Moors, Rector, IHE Delft; Guy Alaerts, Professor Capacity Development, IHE Delft

Rapporteur: Ellen Pfeiffer, Researcher Knowledge and Capacity Development, IHE Delft

The outcomes and recommendations emerging from the symposium will be debated in a high-level panel discussion and refined to a draft Delft Agenda. The recorded panel discussion and draft Agenda will be posted for comments and questions as we collectively refine the final agenda. Viewers can post comments and questions using the comments function beneath the panel video and draft document.

Panellists:

Mr Henk Ovink, Special Envoy for Water of the Kingdom of the Netherlands

Dr Yasir Mohamed, Minister of Water and Irrigation, Khartoum

Dr Lidia Brito, Regional Director Latin America, UNESCO, Montevideo

Dr Wambui Gichuri, Director, Water Development and Sanitation, African Development Bank, Abidjan

Dr Tom Panella, Chief, Water Sector Group, Asian Development Bank, Manila

Dr Silver Mugisha, Managing Director, Uganda National Water and Sewerage Corp., Kampala, and Vice President, International Water Association

Dr Oyun Sanjaasuren, Director, Green Climate Fund, Seoul, and former Minister Environment and Green Development, Mongolia

Dr Veena Srinivasan, Senior Research Fellow, Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment, Bengaluru, India

 


 

You can find all the post-symposium activities on building the Delft Agenda, including a recording of this high-level panel discussion, here.

 

Catherine Cotton

Research and Communications, IHE Institute for Water Education

As an academic I was always interested in impact. Today I have experience across the whole research cycle - producing, disseminating and evaluating it. I'm fascinated by how knowledge does (and doesn't) move across boundaries - be they disciplinary, cultural or sectoral.
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Go to the profile of Catherine Cotton
Catherine Cotton 5 months ago

You can post comments and ask questions to the high-level panel here!

Go to the profile of Jasper Hondelink
Jasper Hondelink 5 months ago

To ask a question to a panel member, please use the format "Q - Name of Panel Member - Your Question" in the comment section below.

Go to the profile of Catherine Cotton
Catherine Cotton 5 months ago

Hello - will be starting shortly !

Go to the profile of Nadine Sander
Nadine Sander 5 months ago

Hi, thanks for this opportunity! The sounds in the livestream is unfortunatey not so good. 

Go to the profile of Wouter Lincklaen Arriëns

Excited to join the discussion here. 

Go to the profile of Reinier Veldman
Reinier Veldman 5 months ago

@ Jasper, it sounds like some participants need to mute their microphone. The sounds is really buzzing now and difficult to follow

 

Go to the profile of Benbella Dektar
Benbella Dektar 5 months ago

Dear Paneslist,
My name is Benbella Dektar from Uganda.
Greetings and hope all is well. I am happy to be with you today. I will ask my questions as I follow the discussions along.
Thank you.

Go to the profile of Kerstin Danert
Kerstin Danert 5 months ago

Q - Ellen - can you give us a practical example of what you mean by 'hard', and 'hard to measure'?

Go to the profile of Ellen Pfeiffer
Ellen Pfeiffer 5 months ago

@Kerstin: It is easy to measure how many people are in a classroom listening to a teacher. It is harder to measure what they learn. The impact of capacity development is concentrated inside people's heads, and can rarely be measured directly. Further impacts are reflected in changes of behavior and decisions, but changes are rarely the outcome of a specific training, but come about as new knowledge and skills interact with local social dynamics. So there is a contribution to complex changes, but not dircet causality.

  

Go to the profile of Kerstin Danert
Kerstin Danert 5 months ago

Thanks Ellen - now I get you very clearly.  You mean measuring the outcomes (and dare I say impact), rather than the outputs.  This can be hard - as even people with skills can be constrained by their enabling environment, or even the policies and practices of their own organisations.  What we have been trying to do is ask our former course participants what they have tried, and where succeeded, or where they got stuck.  This provides insights on the reality and 'wickedness' (as was mentioned) of the problems that they are trying to solve.

Go to the profile of Caroline FIGUERES
Caroline FIGUERES 5 months ago

Has IHE-Delft a theory of change? it could be useful to identify outputs, outcomes and impact and indicators. 

Go to the profile of Caroline FIGUERES
Caroline FIGUERES 5 months ago

Has IHE-Delft a theory of change? it could be useful to identify outputs, outcomes, impact and indicators. 

Go to the profile of Benbella Dektar
Benbella Dektar 5 months ago

Unfortunately, it is quite difficult to follow, the discussions are breaking very often. I could hardly hear Ellen and the precurrent speakers.

Go to the profile of Ellen Pfeiffer
Ellen Pfeiffer 5 months ago

@Kerstin: It is easy to measure how many people are in a classroom listening to a teacher. It is harder to measure what they learn. The impact of capacity development is concentrated inside people's heads, and can rarely be measured directly. Further impacts are reflected in changes of behavior and decisions, but changes are rarely the outcome of a specific training, but come about as new knowledge and skills interact with local social dynamics. So there is a contribution to complex changes, but not dircet causality.

  

Go to the profile of Catherine Cotton
Catherine Cotton 5 months ago

Hi Benbella - can you try refreshing your screen - we had some problems with sound but all seems OK now (from Ellen onwards)

 

Go to the profile of Kalithasan Kailasam
Kalithasan Kailasam 5 months ago

Hi all, I'm Kalithasan from Malaysia. Interesting discussion 

Go to the profile of Catherine Cotton
Catherine Cotton 5 months ago

Hi Kalithasan - thanks for joining!

 

Go to the profile of Wouter Lincklaen Arriëns

Systemic action, collective and individual leadership, agree with Veena.

 

Go to the profile of Joshua Mwendwa Benjamin

Excited to be part of this informative conversation on Delft Agenda

Go to the profile of Oscar Alvarado
Oscar Alvarado 5 months ago

Just wanted to say thanks for organising this event. Many useful insights and experiences being shared!

Go to the profile of Wouter Lincklaen Arriëns

Tailor research and critical to practical needs on-the-ground. Well said Silver Mugisha. 

Go to the profile of Kalithasan Kailasam
Kalithasan Kailasam 5 months ago

Q; DR Lidia- thank you for sharing 3 key elements : knowledge, leadership and integration; the Q is generally who should be the maindriver?

Go to the profile of Kalithasan Kailasam
Kalithasan Kailasam 5 months ago

main driver?

Go to the profile of Nemanja Trifunovic
Nemanja Trifunovic 5 months ago

Q - Dr. Mugisha: I appreciate your comments very much. Thanks. You know, average student at IHE is around 30-years old. I am not surprised that it is the carrier development that matters most in that age. The average leader is much older. Don't you think that it is too early to develop leadership skills at the age of 30? I believe that is is an evolution (life-long-learning). You talk about tailor made programmes, rightly so. Is the leadership in Africa the same as leadership in Asia or Caribbean? 

Go to the profile of Olabimpe Alonge
Olabimpe Alonge 5 months ago

Leadership is key to successful transformation in any society. We should ensure  community authoritative forces(leaders) are part of the transformation framework

Go to the profile of Jayesh Desai
Jayesh Desai 5 months ago

One challenge on this front is the contextual nature of systems, issues, problems. Although one might be conscious about this aspect, this is a critical trade-off especially in case of a large-scale capacity building programme. Integrating contextual concerns becomes difficult to integrate as a key part of the design of the capacity building initiative. One possible way to address this is by developing a CB programme design that has scope for engaging with the local questions, concerns.  

Go to the profile of Nemanja Trifunovic
Nemanja Trifunovic 5 months ago

Q - Mr. Ovink: I believe in South-South collaborations supported from the North working with strong Southern partners who should build capacity of weak Southern partners. To which extent the North governments are under pressure to justify their investments into CD to their tax payers, and therefore looking (wrongly) for quick returns? 

Go to the profile of Kerstin Danert
Kerstin Danert 5 months ago

Comment for Mugisha - thank you for emphasising technical and practical training.  I think that at times we can become too academic with our capacity strengthening discussions.  If people have good, basic, technical skills, as well as a sense of pride in what they are doing, they have some of the foundation for innovation.  You asked me about technical training when I was on the AFWA panel in Kampala in February with Eddy.   As a non-Swiss living in Switzerland, I have really come to appreciate what a national culture of apprenticeships does, not only for the apprentices, but more widely for society.  I would like to hear more talk of apprenticeships which are structured, organised and relevant.  Here they take three years and involve working, as well as classroom learning.  Where are the apprenticeships in Africa for plumbers, builders, drillers, social workers....? Who would like to fund them?  

Go to the profile of Reinier Veldman
Reinier Veldman 5 months ago

Very good point Kerstin.

I believe a large part of the apprenticeship sector is however informal and a lot of small scale (family) businesses, which is likely why this sector is often overlooked in programs.

Or the approach taken is too formal and not sufficiently designed to where the demand is (for example with TEVETs programs).

Go to the profile of Kerstin Danert
Kerstin Danert 5 months ago

Indeed - when I worked in Chad, I was particularly struck by the what was essentially an apprenticeship scheme for a fascinating trader that I interviewed.  Perhaps some work could be done to try and better understand the informal apprenticeships that are taking place, the training programmes available, and see how to better bridge the two.

Go to the profile of Kerstin Danert
Kerstin Danert 5 months ago

Alas in the drilling sector in many countries, those who are teaching others on the job were never formally trained themselves.  This spreads misinformation.  The Uganda Drilling Contractors Association is one of the few examples of action to address this.

Go to the profile of Kerstin Danert
Kerstin Danert 5 months ago

@ Lidia - thanks for talking so eloquently about co-creation!  I also think that this is a way forward, and has been central to my experiences over the past decade and a half in trying to raise the standards of water well drilling.  When we come together and see where our problems and strengths are, we can do so much.  I often talk about development as jazz improvisation - seeing who is there, what they can do, and creating something much bigger and more beautiful. 

Go to the profile of Henk Holtslag
Henk Holtslag 5 months ago

Q to panel. An objective of scaling/ improving CD is to reach SDG6. Some 70% of the SDG6 Target group lives in rural areas so should a large part of the CD also not have a focus on improving access in rural areas? 

Go to the profile of Caroline FIGUERES
Caroline FIGUERES 5 months ago

I cannot agree more about the role of digitalisation to foster development, if done in a wise way (as stated by Veena). See for example the presentation I gave during the Delft Symposium Capacity on water sector development in May 2013 : How ICTs and capacity building go hand in hand to meet the sustainable development goals.

 

Go to the profile of Caroline FIGUERES
Caroline FIGUERES 5 months ago

@all: it is good to define leadership, as it is very much depending on cultural background.   

Go to the profile of Dato' Ir. LIM CHOW HOCK

In most developing countries, strong political leadership and commitment is the key to any effective water transformation.  With 'tonnes' of information, knowledge and  know-how, if there is no political will , not much progress can be seen on the ground.

Go to the profile of Piet Filet
Piet Filet 5 months ago

Q to Henk & Tom

the process of collective action based learning - in grass roots practitioner based networks is a nice pathway to build a broad range of medium term change - how can we elevate and catalyses this approach to compliment the leadership and investments needs that we currently do 

Go to the profile of Nemanja Trifunovic
Nemanja Trifunovic 5 months ago

Q - Mr. Ovink: My experience is that CD gives measured impact in periods of 8-12 years (based on IHE experiences in Ghana, Uganda, and Palestine). On the other hand, the (Nuffic) CD programmes are much shorter. Moreover, the sector specialists in NL embassies worldwide change every 4 years, which all brings some inconsistencies. Why not working with longer, jointly formulated CD programmes agreed bilaterally by North and South government, with identified problems, selected Southern 'champions' mandated to solve them, with the assistance of selected Northern 'champions'? Not necessarily with bigger, but better channelled funding utilised over longer period of time.   

Go to the profile of Caroline FIGUERES
Caroline FIGUERES 5 months ago

Agree with you Nemanja. CD programmes should be designed for a long term period and as you say for longer than a 10 years period. 

Go to the profile of Caroline FIGUERES
Caroline FIGUERES 5 months ago

Business case for capacity development should take into account not only the RoI from the economic point of view. We should also take into account the social and environmental impacts, and unfortunately there are often no metrics for that. (This is the same issue for small-scale rural water supply, if you cannot show the social impact you will not get the funding). 

Go to the profile of Jayesh Desai
Jayesh Desai 5 months ago

Q- Panel- In the context of leadership, very often a strong leaders (bureaucrats) within the government institutions experiences continuous transfers in terms of their posting. The traction build by such leaders in terms of implementing a project in a one location doesn't show end result due to this attrition. How can we do to avoid/reduce this attrition?

Go to the profile of Caroline FIGUERES
Caroline FIGUERES 5 months ago

@thom, fully agree. It is fundamental to understand the deep needs of people. Using technology can very much supportive in that process but only if you ask the right questions and so digital questionnaires should be designed very carefully

Go to the profile of Jayesh Desai
Jayesh Desai 5 months ago

I completely agree with Mr. Henk about investing in partnership right from the beginning. A long term partnership provides a greater opportunity to tackle problems in a much more sustainable manner.  

Go to the profile of Caroline FIGUERES
Caroline FIGUERES 5 months ago

yes indeed. It also allows scaling-up.

Go to the profile of Caroline FIGUERES
Caroline FIGUERES 5 months ago

@IHE : based on what Henk says about people and partnership and Eddy reviewing IHEactivities it may be interesting for IHE to look at the following disconnection in real life : we agree that capacity development of people allows to improve situation (infrastructure, finance) on the long term (called slow track development). But most interventions in the field (donor programmes) are focussing on solutions to "fix" a problem with a bit of training (called Fast track development). Can IHE help to reconnect slow track and fast track ?  

Go to the profile of Eng. Evans Tembo
Eng. Evans Tembo 5 months ago

For developing countries, we need to invest more in enhancing the skills and competences of the fron-tline water and sanitation professionals e.g in Plumbing, water operations, wastewater operations, pit-emptying, electrical technicians/technologist through the TEVET route, and possibly introduce polytechnic degrees. GIZ is already supporting governments in Developing Countries (eg Zambia an Tanzania) in this direction. I can share the TEVET approaches to interested institutions on this.

For a long time the the focus of CD had been on the academic pathway of degrees, masters and PHD! 

Go to the profile of Kalithasan Kailasam
Kalithasan Kailasam 5 months ago

Ok bye, Thank you all

Go to the profile of Alexis  MUDAHERANWA
Alexis MUDAHERANWA 5 months ago

Dear sir,

I am very sorry for not being able to participate in  Discussing panel on 2020 Delft Agenda for Action on Knowledge and Capacity for the Water Sector from 12:00 up to 13 :00  CEST ,the Internet network was challenges for connection But after reading the produced Agenda , I conclude that this document is well done but we have to correction on the Key challenges are 5 not 3 as mentioned.

I am ready to contribute more for their implementation in order to achieving SDG 6 within the left 10 years.

 

Thanks 

 

Alexis MUDAHERANWA/RWANDA